IoT helping divers in shark-infested waters

Sharks, healthcare and #IoT come together during Discovery Channel’s Shark Week

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/at-ts-iot-connectivity-helping-divers-in-shark-infested-waters/

Shark Week on Discovery Channel, and one episode will focus on how paramedics leverage AT&T’s IoT connectivity and a virtual exam room to remotely monitor and diagnose diver conditions in shark-infested waters off the coast of the Bahamas.

The divers and production team on the show were able to access a full clinic through Dictum Health’s Virtual Exam Room (VER) through wireless connectivity from AT&T. Through VER, physicians on land were able to remotely monitor critical vital signs, ECG, and pain levels to ensure the health and safety of the divers and production team.

CityVerve comes to an end – but for Manchester, this is just the beginning

By Mark Duncan @cityverve

From a Council perspective, CityVerve taught us the value of Internet of Things (IoT) technology in improving the way we can design and deliver services for the people who visit, live and work in Manchester.

CityVerve comes to an end – but for Manchester, this is just the beginning

For us, this was a way of realising our objectives within the Our Manchester Strategy using new IoT solutions and working with an impressive set of public and private sector partners.

IoT has huge potential for a local authority. In our case, it opened up new sets of data and also, through the work of FutureEverything on human centred design and citizen engagement, new conversations with residents about what they wanted.

Now, with data giving us a picture of the citizen experience, we can gain new insights into how people are using our city and its services.

And this of course means we have the opportunity to use data and new insights to develop and design services so they better meet the needs of users.

Our experience of CityVerve has directly informed the Council’s emerging new digital strategy for the city, and the lessons and partnerships developed through CityVerve will play a big part in its development.

These Smart Walls Can’t Talk, But They Definitely Can See

Using layers of conductive paint in unique patterns, a research team transformed a wall into a wide-area capacitive sensor and an EM-field sensor.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/these-smart-walls-can-t-talk-they-definitely-can-see

We think of Interior walls for defining and dividing areas (and providing a place to hang things), but what if they could easily and cheaply be transformed into sensors? That’s what a joint project team from Carnegie Mellon Institute School of Computer Science and the Disney Research Pittsburgh has done, as detailed in a paper presented at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factorsin Computing Systems.

Their highly readable paper, “Wall++: Room-Scale Interactive and Context-Aware Sensing” provides full details on how they used conductive paint to add a dual-function role to a standard wall, providing a mutual-capacitance sensor for close-range sensing plus an electromagnetic-field sensor for wider-area performance. The result is what they call the Wall++, which can become part of a “smart” infrastructure to sense human touch, detect gestures, and even determine when appliances are in use

5 IoT Energy-Harvesting Options

New energy-harvesting technologies coupled with energy-efficient battery storage and low-power platforms have pushed the boundaries of where embedded systems, IoT, and edge devices can be utilized.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/power/these-5-iot-energy-harvesting-options-stand-out-field

This article, in Electronic Design,  provides snapshots of some of the latest technologies that allow those devices to siphon energy from their surroundings for operation in remote areas.

Whatever the application, all electronic devices require power of some sort, and energy harvesting is already allowing them to operate in a standalone manner, reducing managing costs and maintenance time in the field.

 

European Parliament fails to ensure security for connected consumer products

European Parliament regrettably missed an opportunity to establish mandatory security requirements for connected products such as smart watches, baby monitors or smart locks. This is the outcome of a vote in its industry (ITRE) committee.

PRESS STATEMENT – 10.07.2018 

http://www.beuc.eu/publications/european-parliament-fails-ensure-it-security-connected-consumer-products/html

Consumers in Europe are exposed to a string of unsecure connected products[1]. These range from hackable security cameras, door locks and heating thermostats in people’s homes, to the possibility for strangers to easily tap into connected toys and smart watches for children.

Consumer groups had urged the EU to ensure that the upcoming Cybersecurity Act would plug this gaping hole in EU legislation to finally protect the security of our lives and homes.

Yet, despite the immense threat to consumers and society as a whole because of unsecure connected products, the European Commission, Member States and (as of today) Parliament are content with only a voluntary scheme that will not appropriately protect consumers’ privacy, security or safety.

A Botnet Compromises 18,000 Huawei Routers

A cyber hacker, by the pseudonym Anarchy, claims to have made a botnet within 24 hours by utilizing an old vulnerability that has reportedly compromised 18, 000 routers of Chinese telecom goliath Huawei.

http://www.ehackingnews.com/2018/07/a-botnet-compromises-18000-huawei.html

As indicated by a report in Bleeping Computer, this new botnet was first recognized in this current week by security researchers from a cyber-security organization called Newsky Security.

Following the news, other security firms including Rapid7 and Qihoo 360 Netlab affirmed the presence of the new danger as they saw an immense recent uptick in Huawei device scanning.

The botnet creator contacted NewSky security analyst and researcher Ankit Anubhav who believes that Anarchy may really be a notable danger who was already distinguished as Wicked.

The activity surge was because of outputs looking for devices that are vulnerable against CVE-2017-17215, a critical security imperfection which can be misused through port 37215. These outputs to discover the vulnerable routers against the issue had begun on 18 July.

Russian hackers penetrate US power stations

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-44937787

Russian hackers have won remote access to the control rooms of many US power suppliers, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The access could have let them shut down networks and cause blackouts, US officials told the newspaper.

The state-backed hackers won access even though command centre computers were not directly linked to the web.

The attacks succeeded by targeting smaller firms which supply utilities with other services.

Only 14% of businesses have implemented even the most basic cybersecurity practices

#IoT #cybersecurity must be a vital and integral part of every organization’s strategic plan.

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/only-14-of-businesses-have-implemented-even-the-most-basic-cybersecurity-practices/

According to a 2018 report from security company Symantec, the number of Internet of Things (IoT) attacks increased from about 6,000 in 2016 to more than 50,000 in 2017, which translates into a 600% rise in just one year. IoT devices are increasingly the attack vector of choice for cybercriminals around the world. IoT is particularly popular for ransomware attacks and illegal cryptocurrency miners.

According to Verizon’s Mobile Security Index 2018, only 14% of the responding organizations said they had implemented even the most basic cybersecurity practices, with an astonishing 32% of these IT professionals admitting that their organization sacrifices mobile security to improve business performance on a regular basis. That general lax attitude toward cybersecurity goes along way toward explaining why IoT attacks have spiked 600% in one year.