Arm acquires Treasure Data and launches IoT platform

Arm acquires Treasure Data and launches Pelion IoT platform to provide end-to-end IoT connectivity, device and data management.

http://www.iotm2mcouncil.org/armtrda

Arm has acquired Treasure Data, a specialist in enterprise data management providing businesses the ability to aggregate and derive insights from disparate data sources, CRM, IoT devices, ecommerce and more.

Arm, a UK-based subsidiary of Japanese firm SoftBank, has also launched its Pelion IoT platform, which combines technologies from US-based Treasure Data, the acquisition of Stream and Arm Mbed Cloud, to provide end-to-end IoT connectivity, device and data management for hybrid environments. The Pelion IoT platform will enable companies to connect seamlessly and securely and manage IoT devices and data at any scale

Smart lock can be hacked ‘in seconds’

Smart lock can be hacked ‘in seconds’

A hi-tech padlock secured with a fingerprint can be opened by anyone with a smartphone, security researchers have found.

On its website, Tapplock is described as the “world’s first smart fingerprint padlock”.

But researchers said it took just 45 minutes to find a way to unlock any Tapplock.

In response, the firm acknowledged the flaw and said it was issuing “an important security patch”.

In a blogpost, security expert Andrew Tierney from Pen Test Partners (PTP), outlined how he had hacked the lock.

“You can just walk up to any Tapplock and unlock it in under two seconds. It requires no skill or knowledge to do this.”

He said he was “so astounded” by how easy it was that he ordered another lock in case his first attempt had been a fluke.

The lock’s software does not take even simple steps to secure the data it broadcasts, he said, leaving it open to several “trivial” attacks.

The “major flaw” in its design is that the unlock key for the device is easily discovered because it is generated from the Bluetooth Low Energy ID that is broadcast by the lock.

Anyone with a smartphone would be able to pick up this key if they scanned for Bluetooth devices when close to a Tapplock.

Using this key in conjunction with commands broadcast by the Tapplock would let attackers successfully open any one they found, said Mr Tierney.

Arm buys Stream Technologies

Arm buys Stream Technologies to provide an integrated device and connectivity management offering to the IoT market

  • Arm has acquired Stream Technologies and will add the company to Arm’s IoT Service Group to extend the Mbed Device Management Platform with connectivity services/service management capabilities.
  • Arm acquired Stream Technologies primarily to further Arm’s overall goal of having its processor designs used in the expected hundreds of billions of future IoT devices.
  • The acquisition’s impact to Arm’s strategic positioning is likely only marginal and incremental, unless Arm adopts “Internet-scale” pricing for the combined service.

Arm makes its sixth acquisition since being acquired itself by Softbank

Arm, the British chip designer acquired by Softbank in September 2016 for $32 billion, today announced its acquisition of Stream Technologies.

Stream Technologies, based in Glasgow, UK, is primarily a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) providing Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity services over cellular, satellite, and LoRaWAN networks, leveraging its connectivity service provider (CSP) partners’ infrastructure. Arm states that Stream Technologies supports roughly 770,000 IoT devices at present.

Stream Technologies also licenses its IoT-X connectivity management platform (CMP) to a handful of mobile operators, but is a relatively small player in this market, compared to companies like Cisco Jasper, Ericsson, Huawei, and Vodafone.

Arm will add Stream Technologies to its IoT Services Group (ISG), where Stream Technologies’ CMP and other technologies will extend the current Mbed Device Management Platform’s capabilities with connectivity management functionality. Since the acquisition of Arm by Softbank, Arm has itself acquired five other smaller firms and increased its headcount by 25%.

The goal is for the integrated platform to further reduce risk, time-to-market, and development costs for IoT developers and customers, by reducing overall development and management complexity. Indeed, IoT developers and other stakeholders regularly report that complexity, along with cybersecurity, poses a very significant challenge to overall IoT market development.

Intel Divorces Wind River Subsidiary

Wind River’s business is based on real-time operating systems and other high-reliability embedded software used in Internet of Things devices, ranging from sensors in connected cars to massive industrial machines that gather reams of data and send it to the cloud. And for the last decade, Wind River has been part of Intel.

But that will soon change. Wind River announced Tuesday that it had been sold to the investment firm TPG and will return to being an independent company. Jim Douglas, Wind River’s current president, will lead the company after the transaction closes in the second quarter. Other terms of the transaction were not announced.

See full article in Electronic Design:

Intel Divorces Wind River Subsidiary, a Decade After Acquisition