Internet of Things Thames Valley Meetup | 11th September

Internet of Things Thames Valley Meetup

There is just 1 week to the next Internet of Things Thames Valley Meetup @tv_iot on 11th September at the Green Park Conference Centre, 100 Longwater Avenue, Green Park, Reading, Berkshire, RG2 6GP.

Internet of Things Thames Valley

Reading, GB
1,772 Members

This group is open (free) for business, academic, public sector and technical professionals interested in the ‘Internet of Things’ who wish network, share knowledge, experienc…

Next Meetup

IoT Thames Valley Meetup #27

Wednesday, Sep 11, 2019, 6:00 PM
68 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

This is a free to attend Meetup. Networking from 6pm.

The Talks & Speakers include:

“5G and Connected Communities, where we are, how we got there and the challenges to come” – Guy Matthews, Director of Emerging Technology, CGI Business Consulting
5G has reached the cusp of moving from a decade of R&D into a decade of deployment across the globe. It will bring immense change across major industries and herald the growth of technologies like immersive and AI. But what is 5G and how will it be implemented across urban and rural communities? This short presentation will cover the basics of 5G, the state of development in the UK and globally, and the remaining commercial and technical challenges to 5G development at scale and load.

“Saving lives on British railways with IQRF” – Šimon Chudoba, CEO IQRF Alliance
IoT can not only reduce operation and maintenance costs or enable completely new business models but literally save lives and avoid derailments on railways. Simon will present one of the solutions of IQRF Alliance members which monitors railway embankments in the UK.

“Can you Trust your Smart Building?” – Duncan Purves, 2 Insight Ltd
Understand the security issues associated with ‘smart’ building systems and why they are important to you

Fingernail wearable monitors disease progression

Grip strength is a useful metric in a surprisingly broad set of health issues. It has been associated with the effectiveness of medication in individuals with Parkinson’s disease, the degree of cognitive function in schizophrenics, the state of an individual’s cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality in geriatrics.
In new research published in Scientific Reports a team from IBM details a first-of-a-kind “fingernail sensor” prototype to help monitor human health. The wearable, wireless device continuously measures how a person’s fingernail bends and moves, which is a key indicator of grip strength
Read more at:

These Smart Walls Can’t Talk, But They Definitely Can See

Using layers of conductive paint in unique patterns, a research team transformed a wall into a wide-area capacitive sensor and an EM-field sensor.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/these-smart-walls-can-t-talk-they-definitely-can-see

We think of Interior walls for defining and dividing areas (and providing a place to hang things), but what if they could easily and cheaply be transformed into sensors? That’s what a joint project team from Carnegie Mellon Institute School of Computer Science and the Disney Research Pittsburgh has done, as detailed in a paper presented at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factorsin Computing Systems.

Their highly readable paper, “Wall++: Room-Scale Interactive and Context-Aware Sensing” provides full details on how they used conductive paint to add a dual-function role to a standard wall, providing a mutual-capacitance sensor for close-range sensing plus an electromagnetic-field sensor for wider-area performance. The result is what they call the Wall++, which can become part of a “smart” infrastructure to sense human touch, detect gestures, and even determine when appliances are in use

From fitness trackers to heart monitors, the IoMT is coming

The Internet of Medical Things, or IoMT

The emerging infrastructure, such as cloud connectivity and platforms as a service, allows the data gathered to be analyzed by medical professionals or even expert AI systems. This can be used to detect the warning signs that often precede a cardiac event. Trend data gathered over longer periods, when compared against larger samples across carefully classified parts of the population, could even lead to much earlier diagnoses of preventable heart conditions. This is the real potential of the IoMT.

See full article in Embedded Computing Design:

From fitness trackers to heart monitors, the IoMT is coming