Tooth-mounted sensors track your diet and health from inside your mouth

Engineers at Tufts University have created tiny #sensors that attach to teeth. It’s not a fashion statement, though it could very well someday become one. Instead, the wireless sensors are designed to monitor health and dietary habits, relaying data about sugar, salt, and alcohol intake to a wearer’s mobile device. It’s like a little nutritionist in your mouth that keeps tabs on every time you cheat on your diet.

See:

Tooth-mounted sensors track your diet and health from inside your mouth

 

 

System draws power from daily temperature swings

Technology developed at MIT can harness temperature fluctuations of many kinds to produce electricity

Thermoelectric devices, which can generate power when one side of the device is a different temperature from the other, have been the subject of much research in recent years. Now, a team at MIT has come up with a novel way to convert temperature fluctuations into electrical power. Instead of requiring two different temperature inputs at the same time, the new system takes advantage of the swings in ambient temperature that occur during the day-night cycle.

The new system, called a thermal resonator, could enable continuous, years-long operation of remote sensing systems, for example, without requiring other power sources or batteries, the researchers say.

For more informal see the MIT News Release:

System draws power from daily temperature swings

Arm delivers integrated SIM identity to secure next wave of cellular IoT devices

Arm has a vision of a trillion connected devices by 2035, and each of these devices will need a secure identity, enabling stakeholders to establish trust – for example, allowing a service provider to trust its device base so it can authenticate devices, provide value added services and if needed, issue security updates.

 

Arm delivers integrated SIM identity to secure next wave of cellular IoT devices

Software Updates for Internet of Things (SUIT) working group publishes drafts

@TheRegister provides an overview here:

Good luck saying ‘Sorry I’m late, I had to update my car’s firmware’

“The IETF has noticed how badly Internet of Things firmware is managed, and wants it fixed. The Software Updates for Internet of Things (SUIT) working group was chartered in December 2017 and given the job of fixing this.”

The IETF drafts can be found here:

A Firmware Update Architecture for Internet of Things Devices

A Secure and Automatic Firmware Update Architecture for IoT Devices

 

University of Surrey to open new £4million nano-manufacturing hub

Nano-manufacturing Hub for smart materials and self-powered electronics:

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/mediacentre/press/2018/university-surrey-open-new-%C2%A34million-nano-manufacturing-hub-kick-start-uk%E2%80%99s

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has awarded £1.6m to the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) and the 5G Innovation Centre (5GIC) at the University of Surrey to establish a hub that will make the manufacturing of smart materials and self-powered electronics a reality in the UK.

The £4.2m project, supported by 32 partner organisations, was co-developed with QinetiQ and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

Living with diabetes is about to get easier with connected health device Actiste

Over 422 million people suffer from diabetes. By 2040 this number is expected to rise to 642 million.

Sweden-based company Brighter was launched in order to provide services and solutions that facilitate self-care and self-monitoring for patients to help them manage their diabetes better.

Brighter has developed Actiste – a connected device that gathers personal health data from diabetes patients and shares it with their caregivers, enabling patients to better manage their condition and caregivers to monitor and personalise their treatment more accurately.

Living with diabetes is about to get easier with connected health device Actiste