IoT helping divers in shark-infested waters

Sharks, healthcare and #IoT come together during Discovery Channel’s Shark Week

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/at-ts-iot-connectivity-helping-divers-in-shark-infested-waters/

Shark Week on Discovery Channel, and one episode will focus on how paramedics leverage AT&T’s IoT connectivity and a virtual exam room to remotely monitor and diagnose diver conditions in shark-infested waters off the coast of the Bahamas.

The divers and production team on the show were able to access a full clinic through Dictum Health’s Virtual Exam Room (VER) through wireless connectivity from AT&T. Through VER, physicians on land were able to remotely monitor critical vital signs, ECG, and pain levels to ensure the health and safety of the divers and production team.

New Wearable Sensor May Soon Replace Blood Tests

Researchers have developed a new stretchable wearable sensor that can measure pH levels from a patient’s sweat—potentially replacing blood tests to measure glucose, sodium, and potassium.

The potential data that can be captured from sweat is equal to that of a blood test. The traditional check for chronic diseases is analyzing a blood sample. However, it is possible to use sweat and tears for the same tests as they contain similar analytes (biomarkers). A research team from the University Glasgow has developed a stretchable sensor that can measure sweat, using it to perform the same tests that would require blood.

The UK-based Bendable Electronics and Sensing Technologies (BEST) group works out of the University of Glasgow. It has developed a new sweat-based, non-invasive sensor directed at monitoring diabetes. The article, entitled “Stretchable wireless system for sweat pH monitoring,”was recently published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics. This work was conducted by Wenting Dang, Libu Manjakkal, William Taube Navaraj, and Ravinder Dahiya from the University of Glasgow; Leandro Lorenzelli from the Fondazione Bruno Kessler; and Vincenzo Vinciguerra from STMicroelectronics. The sensor was developed via the EU-funded project CONTEST.

The wearable uses a pH sensor made from graphite-polyurethane composite, stretchable radio-frequency-identification (RFID) antenna, and a flexible data transmission printed circuit board (PCB). The sensor area is 1 cm2and can stretch up to 53% in length due to a pair of serpentine-shaped interconnecting pieces.

See full MachineDesign article here:

New Wearable Sensor May Soon Replace Blood Tests

Aira’s new smart glasses give blind users a guide through the visual world

Aira has built a service that basically puts a human assistant into a blind user’s ear by beaming live-streaming footage from the glasses camera to the company’s agents who can then give audio instructions to the end users. The guides can present them with directions or describe scenes for them. It’s really the combination of the high-tech hardware and highly attentive assistants.

See:

Aira’s new smart glasses give blind users a guide through the visual world