New Wearable Sensor May Soon Replace Blood Tests

Researchers have developed a new stretchable wearable sensor that can measure pH levels from a patient’s sweat—potentially replacing blood tests to measure glucose, sodium, and potassium.

The potential data that can be captured from sweat is equal to that of a blood test. The traditional check for chronic diseases is analyzing a blood sample. However, it is possible to use sweat and tears for the same tests as they contain similar analytes (biomarkers). A research team from the University Glasgow has developed a stretchable sensor that can measure sweat, using it to perform the same tests that would require blood.

The UK-based Bendable Electronics and Sensing Technologies (BEST) group works out of the University of Glasgow. It has developed a new sweat-based, non-invasive sensor directed at monitoring diabetes. The article, entitled “Stretchable wireless system for sweat pH monitoring,”was recently published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics. This work was conducted by Wenting Dang, Libu Manjakkal, William Taube Navaraj, and Ravinder Dahiya from the University of Glasgow; Leandro Lorenzelli from the Fondazione Bruno Kessler; and Vincenzo Vinciguerra from STMicroelectronics. The sensor was developed via the EU-funded project CONTEST.

The wearable uses a pH sensor made from graphite-polyurethane composite, stretchable radio-frequency-identification (RFID) antenna, and a flexible data transmission printed circuit board (PCB). The sensor area is 1 cm2and can stretch up to 53% in length due to a pair of serpentine-shaped interconnecting pieces.

See full MachineDesign article here:

New Wearable Sensor May Soon Replace Blood Tests

Share with