NIST Report on Lightweight Cryptography

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have published a report on Lightweight Cryptography.

Abstract

NIST approved cryptographic standards were designed to perform well on general purpose computers. In recent years,there has been increased deployment of small computing devices that have limited resources with which to implement cryptography. When current
NIST approved algorithms can be engineered to fit into the limited resources of constrained environments, their performance may not be acceptable. For these reasons, NIST started a lightweight cryptography project that was tasked with learning more about the issues and developing a strategy for the standardization of lightweight cryptographic algorithms. This report provides an overview of the lightweight cryptography project at NIST, and describes plans for the standardization of
lightweight cryptographic algorithms.

To view this report, see:

NIST Report on Lightweight Cryptography

Four wireless standards hackers will target after Wi-Fi

Today, you can buy an easy-to-use graphical attack tool called the Wi-Fi Pineapple. These devices are simply an access point with a collection of attack tools enabled by an easy-to-use graphical web interface that leverage the single biggest weakness in Wi-Fi security: the man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attack

But Wi-Fi isn’t the only wireless protocol out there. Which new wireless communication methods might hackers focus on next? To answer that, we need to ask ourselves two questions:

1. Is there potential value? – Most malicious hackers want a payout. In order for a wireless communication channel to truly become a target, online criminals need to be able to squeeze something of value from it.

2. Is the target easy to find? – Hackers often rely on broad coverage and sheer numbers. For example, they’re not going to waste time hacking a new wireless communication that hasn’t yet seen mass adoption.

For more information see the article written by Ryan Orsi, Director of Product Management at WatchGuard Technologies in Help Net Security:

Four wireless standards hackers will target after Wi-Fi